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Tag Archive: Bizen ware

Elegant Japanese Craftsmanship

  • Posted by:
  • January 26, 2017

Japanese craft (工芸 kōgei) has a long and proud tradition and  includes hand crafts made by an individual or a group. The Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan has stated that crafts (工芸技術 Kōgei Gijutsu), are divided into eight categories: papermaking, woodworking, dollmaking, metalworking, lacquerware, textiles, pottery, and other. The categories are further subdivided into more specific subcategories.

Kokeshi Dolls. | Alex Watson

Many other variations are officially recognized and protected by the government. Craftsmen are eligible for recognition either as an individual (Individual Certification) or as part of a group (Preservation Group Certification), into the list of Living National Treasures of Japan (crafts).

Some crafts are awarded the status of meibutsu, or regional specialties. Each type of Japanese craft takes time to learn. It demands a set of specialized skills that have been passed on for many generations.  Japanese craft works are designed to serve a specific functional or utilitarian purpose, making them beautiful and useful at the same time.

History tells us that Japanese craft dates back to the time humans settled on the Japanese islands. Handcrafting had roots in the rural crafts (traditional crafts production that is carried on, simply for everyday practical use, in the agricultural countryside). Traditionally, handcrafters made use of natural, indigenous materials, even today. Traditional Japanese craft distinguishes itself from decorative arts and fine arts, as being created to be used. Crafts were needed by all levels of Japanese society. The execution and design of each type became increasingly sophisticated over time.

Japanese crafts were developed and taught to succeeding generations. This was known as dentō (伝 統), where systems of Japanese traditions were passed down within a teacher-student relationship (shitei 師弟). It included a strict system of rules to enable learning and teaching of a way (dō 道). It was a common tradition that mastery of certain crafts was passed down within the family for many generations, establishing dynasties. The established master’s name was then assumed instead of the personal one. If there is no male heir, a relative or a student could be adopted to continue the line.

Sake bottle. | Ashley Van Haeften

Some Japanese handicrafts include Kutani ware, from Ishikawa, a style of Japanese Gotō Saijirō porcelain known for its colorful, vibrant painted designs. Kutani ware was established by Gotō Saijirō of the Maeda Clan. Another popular craft is Kokeshi dolls, from Miyagi. They are traditional hand-crafted Japanese wooden dolls with origins traceable to northern Japan. And a final example is Bizen ware. It is characteristically reddish-brown in color. It is known for being hard as iron, and it isn’t glazed like other types of pottery. It has distinct markings from the wood-burning kiln (an insulated chamber or oven with controlled temperature used for hardening or drying earthenware) firing.

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Timeless Bizen Ware: One of Japan’s Popular Forms of Pottery

  • Posted by:
  • October 12, 2012

Pottery, one of Japan’s most famous ancient art forms, dates back to the New Stone Era (10,200 BC).  The earliest earthenware was known as Jōmon ware. Pots were coil-made earthenware decorated with rope patterns and baked in fire.

Bizen ware is characteristically reddish-brown in color. It is known for being hard as iron, and it isn’t glazed like other types of pottery. It has distinct markings from the wood-burning kiln (an insulated chamber or oven with controlled temperature used for hardening or drying earthenware) firing.

Bizen ware. | jar (away)

Making Bizen ware in Bizen, Okayama. | Wikimedia Commons

Bizen is named after the village of Inbe in Okayama Prefecture, previously known as Bizen province. Most of the ceramics produced in the southeastern part of Okiyama Prefecture are known as Bizen ware.  Bizen is one of the six surviving kilns from medieval Japan. The clay from Bizen has a high iron content which makes it resistant to glazing, hence its subdued finish. The outer layer of the earthenware is entirely dependent on the kiln firing. Bizen ware is fired in kilns only once or twice a year because it is a slow process that can take a long time and a lot of wood. The fire is usually kept burning for 10 to 14 straight days.

There are several ways to accentuate Bizen ware. Pine ashes produce a spotted effect known as goma. Wrapping rice straw around the clay can create brown and red markings.  Finally, the precise placement of the pieces in the kiln can produce a multitude of surprisingly beautiful outcomes. Bizen ware has very subtle gradation in color and design that give it a special warmth in appearance. These gradations also give more depth to its own distinct simplicity.

Bizen ware comes in many forms–things we use every day in homes such as pots, plates, jars, and bowls. It was designated a Japanese traditional art form in 1982. From the 6th century to the present, Bizen ware continues to be a favorite among Japanese and people from around the world who appreciate true craftsmanship.

More Bizen ware on display. | jar (away)

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