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Tag Archive: KCP cooking class

Oishi Hambagu!

  • Posted by:
  • February 13, 2017

Hambagu (ハンバーグ), or Japanese hamburger steak, is a popular dish in Japan. It is a fusion food of Japanese and Western cooking techniques. Hambagu is similar to a Western burger, although it is most often served with rice. Ingredients are also different, making the hambagu unique with its own Asian twist.  The usual ingredients include a mixture of ground pork and beef which adds flavor, richness, and soft texture. It is a healthy, quick, easy recipe that the whole family will enjoy. Typical sauce for hambagu is tonkatsu sauce which makes it a Japanese staple.

Hambagu by KCP Fall 2015 students. | KCP Flickr

Differences between hambagu and a typical Western burger are  pretty obvious. It isn’t served on a bun. While Western burgers are commonly eaten with bread, hambagu is paired with rice. The mixture of meat is also a glaring difference. This has a big effect on taste and texture. Hambagu is still a versatile dish that can be enjoyed anyway you like, either on a bun or with rice and with an array of your favorite side dishes!

Try this easy hambagu recipe!

Ingredients:

3/4 pound ground beef
1/4 pound ground pork
1 egg
1/4 cup breadcrumbs
1 medium onion
1/2 tablespoon oil
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon milk
Tonkatsu sauce for drizzling (ketchup, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, sherry, sugar, garlic powder, and ginger)

KCP Fall 2016 cooking class. | KCP Flickr

Directions:

  • Chop onions and cook in a pan over medium heat with oil until translucent. Allow to cool.
  • Combine all other ingredients in a bowl. Divide into patties of desired size, or about 6 patties for this recipe.
  • Heat pan over medium high heat. Cook patties until done at the bottom, then flip. Cover the pan and cook until the other side is done.

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KCP Fall 2016 Students in Cooking Class!

  • Posted by:
  • February 2, 2017

One of the most popular dishes in Japan is hambagu (ハンバーグ), or Japanese hamburger steak. It’s a  quick, delicious, and easy meal to prepare at home and is even readily available at many Yoshoku (Western Japanese) restaurants. It is similar to a Western burger, although it is most often served with rice. Ingredients are also different, making the hambagu unique with its own Asian twist.  The usual ingredients include a mixture of ground pork and beef which adds flavor, richness, and soft texture. Typical sauce for hambagu is tonkatsu sauce which makes it a Japanese staple. You can be creative and top it with your favorite cheese and serve it with all the sidings imaginable like steamed vegetable, french fries, mashed potatoes, rice, and whatever your heart desires.

Check out our KCP Fall 2016 students as they try their hand at cooking hambagu!

All photos, KCP Fall 2016 cooking class.| KCP Flickr.

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Amazing Miso

  • Posted by:
  • July 18, 2016

Miso is a traditional Japanese seasoning made by fermenting soybeans with the fungus kōjikin (Aspergillus oryzae), salt, and other ingredients like barley and rice. The outcome of the fermentation process is usually a thick paste used for sauces and spreads for traditional Japanese culinary fare. It is a delicious Japanese staple that is fast catching the attention of the world, not just for its delicious taste but also for its amazing health benefits!

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The origin of miso is not clear but it can be traced back to Japan’s Neolithical era (Jōmon period 14,000 to 300 BCE). Miso was used for grain and fish and was called “Jōmon miso.” It was similar to the early fish and soy-based sauces used throughout East Asia.  Other types of fermented soy-based food was introduced to Japan at the same time as Buddhism from China. During the Muromachi era (1337 to 1573), Buddhist monks discovered that soybeans can be ground to make a paste which created the cooking methods using miso to flavor other foods.

Miso soup. | www.bluewaikiki.com

Some of the amazing health benefits of miso:

  • Miso contains essential amino acids to make it a complete protein.
  • Miso stimulates secretion of digestive fluids in the stomach.
  • Miso restores probiotics in the intestines.
  • Miso contains isoflavones that inhibit the development of breast cancer in women.
  • Nutrients in miso are vitamin E, vitamin B2, Vitamin K, potassium, lecithin, choline, calcium, and iron.
  • Miso contains linoleic acid, which helps keep the skin soft and supple.
  • Miso is a good source of antioxidants and eliminates free radicals from the body.

Check out our photos of KCP Spring 2016 students as they learn to make miso soup in cooking class.

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KCP Flickr.

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KCP Flickr

More photos of the cooking session here.

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KCP Spring 2016 Students at Cooking Session

  • Posted by:
  • July 4, 2016

Every term, KCP students whip up yummy Japanese meals to be consumed with gusto after all the chopping, slicing, and boiling. Spring 2016 class is no exception. Check out our photos!

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KCP Flickr.

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KCP Flickr.

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KCP Flickr.

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KCP Flickr.

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KCP Flickr.

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KCP Flickr.

 

For more photos of the cooking session, visit our KCP Flickr set.

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KCP Fall 2015 Students Cook Hambagu: Japanese Hamburger Steak

  • Posted by:
  • February 1, 2016

Hambagu (ハンバーグ), or Japanese hamburger steak, is a popular dish enjoyed in Japanese homes. It is available at many Yoshoku (Western Japanese) restaurants. It is similar to a Western burger, although it is most often served with rice. Ingredients are also different, making the hambagu unique with its own Asian twist.  The usual ingredients include a mixture of ground pork and beef which adds flavor, richness, and soft texture. It is a healthy, quick, easy recipe that the whole family will enjoy. Be creative and top it with your favorite cheese and serve it with your favorite sidings. Typical sauce for hambagu is tonkatsu sauce which makes it a Japanese staple.

Check out KCP Fall 2015 students as they learn to cook Japanese hamburger steak. Oishi!

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Making the patties. | KCP Flickr

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Preparing the ingredients. | KCP Flickr

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Sizzling in the pan! | KCP Flickr

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Enjoying the fruits of our labor. | KCP Flickr

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Fall 2015 Cooking Class. | KCP Flickr

Hungry to try and make your very own hambagu steak? Check out this recipe from otakufood.com.

For more photos of the event, visit KCP Flickr.

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Mirin Makes All the Difference with Oyakodon

  • Posted by:
  • March 18, 2013

mirin2

Oyakodon (親子丼), which means “parent-and-child donburi” in Japanese, is a rice bowl dish topped with boneless chicken, egg, and scallions.  It is one of Japan’s favorite comfort foods. In my numerous attempts to recreate a Japanese dish such as oyakodon, I often used to wonder why I keep missing that special sweet taste. I used the best soy sauce, added a bit of sugar, and dashi. But that distinct sweetness still eluded me. When I was taught how to cook some traditional dishes by my Japanese boss’ aunt, I was amazed to find out that mirin was the secret!

Oyakodon. | miyagawa

Mirin (味醂 ) is an important ingredient in most Japanese dishes. It is a type of rice wine that consists of 40% to 50% sugar. It is similar to sake, only sweeter and with a lower alcohol content.

Here is a simple recipe for oyakodon that you can try.

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Ingredients

Chicken:
4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 t grated ginger
½ c flour
1 c Japanese breadcrumbs (Panko)
½ c Vegetable oil

Sauce:
1/4 c soy sauce
3 T Mirin
2 c water
A pinch of dashi
3 T Brown sugar
5 eggs

Thinly sliced leeks for topping

Mirin. | Lec

Directions

Wash the chicken breasts and pat dry. Season with salt, pepper, and grated ginger.  Coat the chicken breasts lightly with flour. Beat one egg in a bowl and mix in about a tablespoon of water. Dip the chicken breast in the egg mixture then coat it with the Japanese bread crumbs.  Heat the vegetable oil in a non-stick pan in medium heat. Fry the chicken breasts until golden brown. Drain off any excess oil.

Combine the soy sauce, mirin, dashi, water, and sugar in a saucepot. Let the ingredients simmer for 10 to 15 minutes in low heat until the alcohol in the mirin evaporates and the sauce reduces.

Cut each chicken breast into strips. Place one cut up chicken breast in a small non-stick pan. Pour in half a cup of the prepared sauce and allow it to boil in medium heat. Break an egg in a bowl and beat. Pour it on top of the chicken and sauce, top it with some leeks, and cover for a minute or two until the egg is cooked.

Place cooked rice in a bowl, then slide in the chicken, sauce, and egg on top. Repeat the procedure for the other breasts. And there you have it: delicious oyakodon. Enjoy!

 

Aiming for perfect balance of taste

Recently, the KCP Winter term cooking class, together with Hosei University students,  had a chance to make tasty oyakodon. For more photos, visit our KCP Cooking Class Photo Set.

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KCP Cooking Class, Fall 2012, Makes Buta-Don and Ton-Jiru

  • Posted by:
  • December 17, 2012

This fall term, the KCP cooking class and students from Hosei University gathered together to create succulent buta-don (pork bowl) and ton-jiru (pork soup). By the time class was over, everyone was full and had made new friends.

Cooking class is one of the co-curricular activities KCP offers students as a way of having fun and using their Japanese outside of class.

Preparing the bowls. | KCP Flickr

Cooking the pork. | KCP Flickr

 Preparing the vegetables. | KCP Flickr

Eating what we made. Yum! | KCP Flickr

Good food and great company. | KCP Flickr

Time for a group shot! | KCP Flickr

More cooking class photos here.

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KCP Class Cooks with Japanese Students

  • Posted by:
  • March 3, 2012

Something about food and enjoying it brings people closer together. In mid-February, the KCP cooking club had a blast in their cooking session with Japanese college students from Hosei University.

Under the supervision of Tanaka-san and Utami-san, KCP rented a cooking room at Yotsuya Ward Center, where students created delicious gyoza (Chinese dumplings) and mapo tofu (a Szechuan dish made of marinated pork, mashed black beans, and bean curd.) Both these dishes originated in China but are now a part of daily Japanese cuisine.

Everyone had a fantastic time cooking and eating their succulent creations, while in the company of new friends.

Students make gyoza by wrapping a meat mixture with gyoza skin, which is made of flour. | KCP Flickr

Food looks delicious; everyone’s totally absorbed in their “work.” | KCP Flickr

Students take a little break from cooking to smile for the camera. | KCP Flickr

KCP students show off their culinary creation. | KCP Flickr

Past culinary adventures–

Japanese curry

A curry recipe

Learning lots of ways

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KCP Students Try Their Hand at Japanese Curry

  • Posted by:
  • August 4, 2011

Japanese students from Hosei University joined us in curry cooking. US program students and Japanese students worked together in groups to cook rice, curry sauce, and salad.

KCP students prepare the curry ingredients. | KCP Flickr

KCP students wash the rice before cooking. | KCP Flickr

Washing the greens for the salad. | KCP Flickr

For many students, this was the first time they cooked curry rice, but in the end all teams made delicious curry! | KCP Flickr

KCP students at Summer 2011 cooking class. | KCP Flickr

A LIttle Background on Japanese Cuisine

Japanese cuisine is what it is today mainly due to the influences of social and cultural changes in Japan’s history. When Japan was isolated from Western influences during the Tokugawa era, Japan relied on their own style of cooking. Buddhism discouraged using meat. In the 1970s, the impact of American fast-food on a global scale reached Japan: hamburger, fried chicken, and other types of Western food.

As the taste in food of the Japanese people changed, so did the ingredients. Japan’s national seclusion reached its end in 1868. Japan began embracing other cooking styles and inspirations from other countries, while incorporating them with the traditional Japanese concepts.

Japanese Curry

Curry (カレー) is a popular dish in Japan. It is mainly served in three ways: with rice,with bread,  and with noodles (udon). Other variations are katsu curry (breaded and fried pork topped with curry) and curry bun, similar to a Chinese dim sum pork bun, only with curry inside.

The true origins of curry are uncertain, yet it is said to have originated from India and Sri Lanka and is from a Tamil word ‘kari’ that means gravy or sauce over rice. When the British established a colony in East India, curry reached British shores. Later, curry reached Japan when Japan opened its ports during the latter part of the Edo period (1872).  In 1910, a Japanese curry recipe was popularized, with carrots, onions, and potatoes. Japanese curry is a sweet and savory stew, while Indian curry contains more spices.

Japanese curry with rice | jetalone

Today, each country has their own version of curry, adding local and regional ingredients.

You can read more about Japanese curry by following this link.

 

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